Review – The Lighthouse (2019) **31 Days of Horror**

by Old King Clancy

In recent years, my reviewing habits have slowed down more than I would’ve liked, since entering the workforce it’s been hard to watch, think and write about films whilst also balancing work and personal lives. I’ve started to pick it up again in the last few months and the reason for this was The Lighthouse, because when I walked out of that first viewing I knew I wanted to write down my thoughts on this film and explain in great detail why it’s a goddamn modern masterpiece of isolationist horror.

Which given our current climate, this film hits a little closer to home now than I realized.

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Review – The Lighthouse (2019)

by Kevin Muller

When writer and director Robert Eggers burst on to the scene with 2016’s The Witch, he gave us a true New England horror tale. What he succeeded in doing was creating an immersive experience for the viewers. A majority of the time, when films are set in a different time periods, the accents are shoddy, the cinematography too clean, or the actors can’t nail the true essence of the characters. Eggers nailed all three of those aspects and much more. For his next feature, he has given us a movie, that takes place at the end of the 19th century, located in New England, with his two actors speaking in thick New England accents. Does he go two for two, or was his first effort a fluke?

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LETO (2019) – Interview with Michael and Lily Idov

by Logan Myerz

It’s officially the first day of Summer and there’s no better way to celebrate the hottest season of the year than watching the new film Leto. The films title which is Russian for “summer,” tackles a rock ‘n’ roll daydream based on the early days of the famous Soviet-Korean musician Viktor Tsoi, his musician friend Mike Naumenko, and Mike’s wife Natalia. This creates a somewhat complex music love triangle between the three individuals that adds substance to the early 80’s Soviet music scene. The black and white frames used in the film is painted beautifully to describe youth, rebellion, freedom, love, and the oppression that was occurring at that time in the Soviet Union.

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Retro Review – Un Chien Andalou (1929)

Nile Fortner is back with the Retro Review series to review the 1929 short film, Un Chien Andalou.

Synopsis:
“In a surrealistic film with input from Salvador Dalí, director Luis Buñuel presents stark, surrealistic images including the slitting open of a woman’s eye and a dead horse being pulled along on top of a piano. A mysterious film open to interpretations ranging from deep to completely meaningless, this short (17-minute) film certainly presented something new in the cinema of its day.”