Review – Slice (2018)

by Old King Clancy

Movies like Slice are part of a genre that I’m now trade-marking as “Kitchen Sink Movies,” films like Detention and Freaks Of Nature that take wildly outlandish concepts, throw the kitchen sink at the screen, and pray to god that it’s entertaining because it’s sure as hell not gonna make any sense. It’s a difficult genre to pull off since you run the risk of going too far and blurring out any attempt at story, or you don’t go far enough and your wild concept just feels flimsy and unfocused. In the case of Slice, it unfortunately suffers from the latter issue.

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COMET & Charge TV UNBOXING and September #PhellasGiveAway !

Are you ready for a Spacey-week?

I hope so, because COMET TV has so many cool things in September! COMET TV is the new home of the cult classic Space: 1999! The out of this world series starring Martin Landau is a fun retro adventure, you’ll love!

Space1999 v1

Plus, there are Godzilla Double Features, Dr. Who and more!

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Review – BlacKkKlansman (2018)

by Armando Vanegas

It’s a been a bittersweet time in this country that’s been mostly bitter in ways thanks to the current political state here in America. However, part of what’s been sweet about this year is that whether it’s coincidence or not, a lot of black voices have been able to get a chance to express themselves in such original ways as Black Panther, Sorry to Bother You, Atlanta, and now Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman. For the most part, Lee succeeds with what he attempts to put on the screen. It’s a Spike Lee movie so you can definitely say that it’s not boring. The plot of the movie concerning Colorado Springs’ first black police officer in the 1970’s posing as a prospective KKK member who then recruits a Jewish officer to pose as the member in person to infiltrate the Klan. This is pretty unusual and to the movie’s credit, it does a lot with it by using it as a springboard to comment on recent political issues or social commentary that concerns the black community that may have been said before, but needs to reiterated for those who still aren’t able to get the message. For the most part, it never bothered me because it seems to come from a genuine place. While Lee is still Lee, this seem to be more mature and relatively calm to his other movies in its approach to its many ideas. It’s still very ambitious and maybe has too much to say. But it’s at least got some verve to it that I admire for bringing something to the table that will inspire some great food for thought, while simultaneously being an entertaining time at the movies.

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