Review – Green Book (2018)

We reviewed Peter Farrelly’s Green Book that’s nominated for 5 Oscars! The 91st Academy Awards will air on Sunday, February 24th.

#Greenbook #GreenBookMovie #MovieReview #Oscars

“A working-class Italian-American bouncer becomes the driver of an African-American classical pianist on a tour of venues through the 1960s American South.”

 

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Review – Bottle Rocket (1996)

by Armando Vanegas

Sometimes, I get bored reviewing new movies so for some reason, I wanted to go through all the Wes Anderson movies in chronological order in the meantime. It’s just something that gives me a challenge to do and maybe there will be unexpected feelings and unique thoughts I never saw coming. So, without further delay, let’s begin with his 1996 debut, Bottle Rocket. I remember this being a movie that got a lot of play on Comedy Central back in the day and it was always the kind of movie that I never felt compelled to watch when it’s on. Honestly, I was never impressed with the bits I’d seen, but there were always interesting sequences that made the rest of the movie worth it. So, in subsequent years, I would watch bits and pieces because there was sometimes nothing to watch on cable. When I last watched this movie, I rated this movie rather highly back when I was more of a snob when it came to movies. But as anyone who has read my Phantom Thread review, I’ve decided to just to watch movies as their own individual self, judge them as their own thing no matter who’s involved in terms of the directors, the writers, or the actors. Watching this again was interesting. As a movie directed by someone who would be later become one of the most idiosyncratic and quirky filmmakers of our time, younger middle school me who watched this on cable was right. Outside of a few well directed sequences, it’s fine.

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Review – Pacific Rim: Uprising (2018)

by Old King Clancy

Despite not having revisited it since my initial viewing I have good memories of the first Pacific Rim, it managed to capture the awe-inspiring nature of watching giant robots fight giant monsters. The less than stellar reviews for the sequel had me disheartened, but enough goodwill had carried over and I was willing to give Uprising a shot.

Turns out I probably shouldn’t have.

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Review – Glass (2019)

by Armando Vanegas

M. Night Shyamalan is known for doing two things: taking risks and disappointing people with said risks. But more often than not, his hits and his misses can be interesting to vastly varying degrees. Honestly, I don’t know if I would’ve been as interested to see his new movie Glass if I didn’t see such a mixed reaction on it just because of how strong the reaction varied from masterpiece to complete dumpster fire. I even remember seeing one of his previous movies,The Village, having more or less the same kind of reaction and watching that movie is quite a ride. While it’s not a masterpiece, it was still compelling despite knowing the reveal because at least Shyamalan took chances with the material. But Glass has the advantage of being a sort of sequel to Unbreakable, a movie I remember really enjoying. Hopefully, this will mean Bruce Willis is going to decide to give a shit this time around. I wasn’t the biggest fan of Split and it seems like this is going to be a significant part of this sort of Unbreakable sequel, but the trailer looked interesting and the mixed reviews had me intrigued so let’s see.

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Review – The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot (2019)

by Old King Clancy

There’s a lot of value in a name, if I see a movie called Hobo With A Shotgun, I know that I’m probably in for something violent, something ridiculous, and something fun. Or if I see a movie called 2 Fast 2 Furious, I know it’s probably “Dude-Bro Dog-Shit.” So when I got the chance to watch a movie called The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot, I had all kinds of B-Movie ideas in my head about what it could be. To my surprise, the film is actually a reflective look on one man’s amazing life and the decidable un-amazing place he’s found himself in his old age. And I’m not sure how I feel about that, it’s not that the film wasn’t what I was expecting it to be, and the film itself didn’t know what it wanted to be.

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Review – Fyre Fraud and Fyre: The Greatest Party that Never Happened (2019)

by Armando Vanegas

Recently, the world has gone Fyre Festival crazy due to the release of two documentaries on that very subject, courtesy of Netflix and Hulu. Because I want to write more reviews in the new year, I wanted to get out of my comfort zone and actually review a documentary (or in this case, two) for once and maybe more in the future. But I also wanted to write about these movies because this is a subject that speaks to me as a millennial and probably to many others like me. I mean, when I saw all those girls in bikinis and Ja Rule was going to be in this festival. I thought this is something I have to sell everything I own as this festival is going to be the thing that’s going to make our lives worth it, and nothing else will add up. Seriously, if I ever say those last few sentences genuinely, you’re legally allowed to give me a Stone Cold Stunner.

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Review – Glass (2019)

by Kevin Muller

Almost 19 years ago, M. Night Shyamalan, followed up his critical, and hugely successful, The Sixth Sense, with a film called Unbreakable. It divided audiences with its serious approach that it took to the comic book lore. Some thought it was pretentious dribble, while others thought it had such brilliance and approached medium in a unique way. For years, Shyamalan teased a sequel to it, but nothing ever developed. Instead, he produced a decade of films that both flopped and were hated by audiences. No one will be able to imagine mother nature and Mark Wahlberg together without laughing.   Then, in 2017, he gave us a new film called Split. It was about a group of girls being abducted by a mad man with multiple personalities, named Kevin Wendell Crumb, or the Horde, who were trying to escape before it was too late. James McAvoy, brilliantly played the antagonist, and it seemed that Shyamalan remembered how to direct a masterful thriller. Then, the ending happened, and you could hear the collective gasps from everyone as it was revealed that this was the sequel to Unbreakable that we had been waiting for. As Bruce Willis’s character, David Dunn, sat at a diner counter top with the theme song from the original film, he now understood that the city of Philadelphia had to be protected, and he had to take down this new threat. After all these years, was it worth the wait?

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