Invincible – Season 1 : Prime Video Review

The phellas attend Reginald VelJohnson High School with Mark Grayson and review the first season of the hit animated superhero series Invincible, now streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

#INVINCIBLE #InvincibleOnPrime #TVReview

“An adult animated series based on the Skybound/Image comic about a teenager whose father is the most powerful superhero on the planet.”

Review – Utopia : Season 1 (2020)

Logan Myerz reviews the first season of Gillian Flynn’s dystopian comic-book thriller Utopia. The series stars Sasha Lane, Rainn, Wilson, John Cusack, Jessica Rothe, Christopher Denham and is currently streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

#Utopia #TVReview #PrimeVideo

“A group of young adults, who meet online, get a hold of a cult underground graphic novel, which not only pins them as a target of a shadowy deep state organization, but also burdens them with the dangerous task of saving the world.”

Review – Hunters (2020)

Logan Myerz reviews the first season of Hunters that’s executive produced by Jordan Peele and starring Al Pacino and Logan Lerman. The first season is currently streaming on Prime Video!

#Hunters #HuntersTV #HuntersAmazon #TVReview

“In 1977, in New York City, a troubled young Jewish man bent on revenge is taken in by a secret group of Nazi hunters fighting a clandestine war against the cabal of high-ranking Nazi officials in hiding who work to create the Fourth Reich.”

 

Review – Patriot Season 1 & 2

by Armando Vanegas

Amazon has a streaming service called Prime Video or Amazon Prime Video or Amazon Prime or whatever they’re calling it now. I don’t know if you know that. How else would you know that? Unless you read your monthly bank statement that says they took money from you if you ever bought a subscription to them. On the one hand, Amazon is wonderful for purchasing products of all kinds. On the other, they really gotta do some work in promoting their streaming service because it has some great content. It was just blind luck that I came across Patriot, a brilliantly surreal and hilarious spy comedy from Steven Conrad, the writer of the Will Smith drama The Pursuit of Happyness (probably the furthest removed from his style), the similarly surreal Nicolas Cage dramedy The Weather Man, and the just as surreal John C. Reilly/Seann William Scott buddy dramedy, The Promotion. Even though I liked those aforementioned movies, I didn’t know what to expect as the trailer didn’t exactly grab me. Neither did the trailers for their other shows. I just wanted to try some Amazon programming and this was the one that seemed relatively interesting to me. What the show accomplishes by the end should make it a must see for people wanting something weirder and more out there in their TV choices.

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Review – Divorce (Seasons 1 + 2)

by Armando Vanegas

Divorce is an HBO series in which Sarah Jessica Parker and Thomas Haden Church are Frances and Robert, a couple who, after a strange event at a friend’s house, realize that they’re stuck in a rut in their marriage, causing them to divorce. Created by Irish actress/writer/producer Sharon Horgan of Amazon’s Catastrophe and IFC’s The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret and executive produced by Paul Simms of NewsRadio, Atlanta, and Girls, the series offers an unflinching look at what happens when two adults decide to get a divorce and the complications that come as a result while attempting to keep things as civilized as possible. The show is great at showing how different both Frances and Robert might have their faults, but no one is painted as an outright villain as the actors bring multiple dimensions to their characters, so that we can understand what they loved in each other and what made them break apart.

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Review- Twin Peaks: The Return (2017)

 

by Armando Vanegas

Shows that come back from a long hiatus can be tricky because you don’t know how it will be perceived and it’s hard to know if it will have the same impact that it did with viewers from years ago. The other thing to consider is that people change and as a result, feelings and sensibilities change. This seems to be a big part of what co-creators David Lynch and Mark Frost were aware of coming into this new season of Twin Peaks, also known as Twin Peaks: The Return, as it seems to have a somewhat different feel from the original series. Whereas the old show contained lots of intentional soap opera satirical aesthetics, these new episodes have a more experimental and esoteric feel that is more fitting on its new premium cable home, Showtime. As usual with any David Lynch project, you’re not going to be given simple answers and satisfying conclusions. As long as you’re okay with that going in, you’re bound get something out of this. It’s not exactly a fun watch, but it gives you something to chew on even if it can be hard to wrap your head around at times thanks to the trademark surrealism on display.

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