Euphoria – Seasons 1 + 2 HBO Review

Logan and Armando review the first two seasons of the hit HBO high school series Euphoria, starring Zendaya in her Emmy-winning role.

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“A look at life for a group of high school students as they grapple with issues of drugs, sex, and violence.”

Yellowjackets – Season 1 Review

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We reviewed the premiere episode and the fine young cannibals Logan and Henry are back to review the first season of the hit Showtime series Yellowjackets.

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“A wildly talented high school girl soccer team becomes the (un)lucky survivors of a plane crash deep in the Ontario wilderness.”

Review – Boys State (2020)

by Kevin Muller

Every year, in each individual state, an event happens that gathers 1100 adolescent boys to participate in tradition called Boys State. The American Legion sponsored program shows these inspired young men the ins and outs of politics through the course of a strenuous seven days, where they must form a mock government. By the end, the Legion hopes that the young men will be made aware of the politics, democracy, and effort it takes to running a successful campaign. Famous political figures such as Dick Cheney, Corey Booker, Bill Clinton, Rush Limbaugh, and many others, have participated in this event. Directors Jesse Moss and Amanda McBride guide us through a world that includes all the juicy aspects of politics: unity, idealism, hope, and backstabbing. Is this peek into the 85 year old institution worth the ride?

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Retro Review – Prom Night (1980)

“As children, they played a killer’s game. Now, it’s the killer’s turn to play with them.” Logan Myerz revisits one of the early 80s slasher flicks Prom Night that defined the sub-genre. The film is directed by Paul Lynch and stars Jamie Lee Curtis and Leslie Nielsen.

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“At a high school senior prom, a masked killer stalks four teenagers who were responsible for the accidental death of a classmate six years previously.”

Review – Booksmart (2019)

by Kevin Muller

Olivia Wilde has been in the business for over ten years. As an actress, she’s juggled a career starring in both projects on television and film. On top of being strikingly beautiful, she carries herself with confidence, possessing both a razor sharp wit and deep intellect. Both her parents were respected journalists that rubbed elbows with many influential people during their careers. Wilde has spoken of many anecdotes, from her childhood, involving people from the political and entertainment world. She has been surrounded by respected people all her life. It is a lot to live up to and now she has challenged herself to be more than a pretty face. She has tried her hand at directing a coming of age story, with two female leads. How does she do with her first directorial debut?

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Review – Booksmart (2019)

by Old King Clancy

Going into Booksmart, I’d had the film on the edge of my radar, mostly due to it being the directorial debut of Olivia Wilde, the strong reviews and was being touted as the female Superbad. This was a description I later found out was more apt than I initially thought with one of the lead actresses being Jonah Hill’s sister – but had I not been given a free ticket to see the film early, I might have waited before checking this one out. Instead, I’m going to use this platform to tell people to go out there and see this film because it’s a hilarious, dirty, and an unclichéd look into female friendships and the life of a modern high-school student that deserves more than just being called the female Superbad.

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Review – Eighth Grade (2018)

By Armando Vanegas 

Comedian Bo Burnham’s feature film debut Eighth Grade, a new movie about a young girl going through the last week of eighth grade, will probably make most people’s skin crawl, due to how it manages to hit so close to home depending on one’s personal childhood experiences. But it made this reviewer feel very engaged and invested for just that reason due in part to Burnham’s skills behind the camera. He makes a rather simple slice of life story as convincing enough for someone like its introverted and social media obsessed main character Kayla, played by actress Elsie Fisher. Fisher proves to have a future in movies as her role fits her like a glove. She doesn’t so much announce herself as a star in the making, so much as she quietly nudges to the person next to her and writes it in a note to pass it down the theater aisle. She finds a way to make this character both sympathetic and off-putting, sometimes in the same scene. She makes the moments of her character’s anxiety feel too real and gives a lot of unexpected tension to the proceedings. She also successfully manages to embody the feeling of alienation that one gets from that awkward time in one’s life while struggling to make a connection through social media. This is one of the ways the movie manages to subvert expectations while being more thoughtful and emotionally in-depth than most other coming of age movies.

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