Review – Everything Everywhere All at Once (2022)

An aging Chinese immigrant is swept up in an insane adventure, where she alone can save the world by exploring other universes connecting with the lives she could have led. Watch our review of the A24 film Everything Everywhere All at Once.

#EverythingEverywhereAllAtOnce #everythingeverywhere #moviereview

Review – Saint Maud (2020)

Scarborough has a starring role in hit horror movie Saint Maud | The Scarborough News

Those wild Catholicism enthusiasts are back to review A24‘s newest film Saint Maud that’s written/directed by Rose Glass and starring Morfydd Clark. The film arrives in select theaters & drive-ins on January 29th and will be available to stream on EPIX on February 12th!

#SaintMaud #MovieReview

“Follows a pious nurse who becomes dangerously obsessed with saving the soul of her dying patient.”

Review – Saint Maud (2019)

by Old King Clancy

In keeping with what I’ve said beforehand, every year seems to have one standout horror film that’s a critical darling if a little iffy with audience; The Babadook, The VVitch, and Hereditary. For 2020 that horror film – aside from the obvious plague that’s screwing us all over – seems to be Saint Maud, and since the majority of these critically acclaimed horrors I’ve absolutely loved, I wanted to see if this would be a winner. And by God it was, this is a chilling, disorienting, and disturbing look at faith and the dangers of unchecked insanity.

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Review – Waves (2019)

by Armando Vanegas

Waves is the new epic family drama from every millennial’s favorite movie studio A24 and writer/director, Trey Edward Shults. Going into it, I was excited. Mainly because it was Sterling K. Brown aka Randall from This is Us in what looked like a lead role. Also, the trailer, like any for an A24 movie, looked like this was another success in their long ring of successes. I don’t know anything about Shults as a filmmaker, although I heard very good things about his previous movies, It Comes at Night and Krisha. Look, as a black person, there’s not a lot of family dramas in the mold of Terence Malick and Punch Drunk Love coming our way, so the fact that was a movie about a successful black family having nothing to do with them being black in addition to some beautiful cinematography was exciting. I was getting The Place Beyond the Pines feelings as I was hearing about the details about it and the way people were being so elusive about what it specifically was about. It’s cool that movies like this or Sorry to Bother You or Moonlight are finally getting the chance to have a platform to tell stories featuring black centric casts, yet making the stories universal. Having seen the final product, I appreciate what Shults, who happens to be white, did with the ideas he had of telling this story about these very specific individuals and it paid off very well.

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Review – Midsommar (2019)

By Kevin Muller

What made Ari Astar’s 2018 film, Hereditary, so chilling was the skilled build up to each scene. Most horror films have no subtlety whatsoever that rely on constant jump scares and the sudden heightening of audio effects. Astar’s movies may move at a snail’s pace, but once the scares kick in, he let’s you sit in the fear, paranoia, and any other negative feeling that conjures up in any given scene. Where his first feature lured in darkness, his new film basks in the sunlight. Does he give us a worthy follow up or fall into a Sophomore slump?

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