Review – Saint Maud (2020)

Scarborough has a starring role in hit horror movie Saint Maud | The Scarborough News

Those wild Catholicism enthusiasts are back to review A24‘s newest film Saint Maud that’s written/directed by Rose Glass and starring Morfydd Clark. The film arrives in select theaters & drive-ins on January 29th and will be available to stream on EPIX on February 12th!

#SaintMaud #MovieReview

“Follows a pious nurse who becomes dangerously obsessed with saving the soul of her dying patient.”

Review – Saint Maud (2019)

by Old King Clancy

In keeping with what I’ve said beforehand, every year seems to have one standout horror film that’s a critical darling if a little iffy with audience; The Babadook, The VVitch, and Hereditary. For 2020 that horror film – aside from the obvious plague that’s screwing us all over – seems to be Saint Maud, and since the majority of these critically acclaimed horrors I’ve absolutely loved, I wanted to see if this would be a winner. And by God it was, this is a chilling, disorienting, and disturbing look at faith and the dangers of unchecked insanity.

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BEYOND FEST ANNOUNCES 2020 FULL LINE UP!!!

Beyond Fest announces the first physical genre festival of the year with week-long drive-in residence including world premieres of Christopher Landon’s from Blumhouse FREAKY, Adam Egypt Mortimer’s ARCHENEMY, and Jim Cummings’ THE WOLF OF SNOW HOLLOW.

Beyond Fest, the highest-attended genre film festival in the US, is excited to announce its complete slate of 2020 programming comprising of seven nights of double-bill features including three world premieres, one North American Premiere, and two US premieres of unadulterated cinematic excess. Following a sold-out Summer residence with the American Cinematheque at the Mission Tiki Drive-In, Beyond Fest returns to the socially-distanced safety of the drive-in Friday, October 2nd – Thursday, October 8th to generate funds for the 501c3 non-profit film institution.

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Review – Boys State (2020)

by Kevin Muller

Every year, in each individual state, an event happens that gathers 1100 adolescent boys to participate in tradition called Boys State. The American Legion sponsored program shows these inspired young men the ins and outs of politics through the course of a strenuous seven days, where they must form a mock government. By the end, the Legion hopes that the young men will be made aware of the politics, democracy, and effort it takes to running a successful campaign. Famous political figures such as Dick Cheney, Corey Booker, Bill Clinton, Rush Limbaugh, and many others, have participated in this event. Directors Jesse Moss and Amanda McBride guide us through a world that includes all the juicy aspects of politics: unity, idealism, hope, and backstabbing. Is this peek into the 85 year old institution worth the ride?

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Top 10 Best & Worst Films of 2019

by Kevin Muller

The Top 10 Worst Films of 2019

10. The Kitchen  

The tenth spot on this list is reserved for, not necessarily a bad film, but for one that given the talent involved, should’ve worked.  Based upon the Graphic Novel, “The Kitchen” tells the story of three women who are romantically involved with men connected to the Irish Mob. When the men are all thrown in jail, the three must band together to continue the men’s work, to avoid financial debt to themselves, and the community that depends on the mob. The leads are played by Elisabeth Moss, Tiffany Haddish, and Melissa McCarthy, in what seemed to be the perfect trio to pull this off.   Unfortunately, a story that should’ve been about female empowerment, was just so lifeless on its execution. The film also failed to carry a consistent tone. It tried to be funny, with awkward results, it tried to be a crime drama, but failed to give the controversial story any type of spark. It was the definition of a missed opportunity.

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Review – Waves (2019)

by Armando Vanegas

Waves is the new epic family drama from every millennial’s favorite movie studio A24 and writer/director, Trey Edward Shults. Going into it, I was excited. Mainly because it was Sterling K. Brown aka Randall from This is Us in what looked like a lead role. Also, the trailer, like any for an A24 movie, looked like this was another success in their long ring of successes. I don’t know anything about Shults as a filmmaker, although I heard very good things about his previous movies, It Comes at Night and Krisha. Look, as a black person, there’s not a lot of family dramas in the mold of Terence Malick and Punch Drunk Love coming our way, so the fact that was a movie about a successful black family having nothing to do with them being black in addition to some beautiful cinematography was exciting. I was getting The Place Beyond the Pines feelings as I was hearing about the details about it and the way people were being so elusive about what it specifically was about. It’s cool that movies like this or Sorry to Bother You or Moonlight are finally getting the chance to have a platform to tell stories featuring black centric casts, yet making the stories universal. Having seen the final product, I appreciate what Shults, who happens to be white, did with the ideas he had of telling this story about these very specific individuals and it paid off very well.

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